Adventures in Literacy Land: movement

Showing posts with label movement. Show all posts
Showing posts with label movement. Show all posts

Sing Them A Story

Greetings!

This month is our two-year birthday here at Adventures in Literacy Land, and the plan is to have a good time sharing what we do best in our little classroom corners of the kingdom!

It has truly been a pleasure and a privilege for me to contribute to this collaborative blog for a year now!  I am always thoroughly inspired and educated by my fellow ALL friends each and every time I read their posts!  I can only hope that you come away from what I have to say with at least one or two ideas that you can use in your classroom tomorrow!


Songs that tell stories and piggyback off of familiar folk tunes are perfect ways to help primary grade students develop reading fluency!




Songs that tell stories and piggyback off of familiar folk tunes are perfect ways to help primary grade students develop reading fluency!




In my twenty-five years as an advocate for blending music, movement, and literature across the curriculum, I have had many teachers tell me....

"Oh I can't carry a tune!  I can't include songs or chants in my teaching if I can't sing!"  

I just smile and say...

"The kids don't care if you sound like a sick frog. They will just start singing with you no matter how you sound!"

They then try to counter with.....

"But it's easy for you.....you play the guitar!"

I smile even more widely and say......

"But PIGGYBACK SONGS don't require instruments!"

Piggyback songs just require familiarity with the tunes of old and traditional folk songs, nursery rhymes, and circle games from your childhood.  Everybody knows the tune to Farmer In The Dell, London Bridges, Did You Ever See A Lassie, and A-Tisket, A-Tasket, right?

Now just grab some chart paper, a marker, and model how to change the words to fit your lesson topic or unit theme!  For example, today during our morning meeting, my "Sally Squirrel" puppet helped my second graders recall and sort the migrators, hibernators, and adaptors we'd met while reading  
Jan Brett's Annie and the Wild Animals.  


Songs that tell stories and piggyback off of familiar folk tunes are perfect ways to help primary grade students develop reading fluency!








Their anchor chart then inspired me to write two piggyback songs to help the group review and remember our important science concepts, which then inspired me to write a few more winter-themed songs for YOU to use with your primary grade students!  



Songs that tell stories and piggyback off of familiar folk tunes are perfect ways to help primary grade students develop reading fluency!




Songs that tell stories and piggyback off of familiar folk tunes are perfect ways to help primary grade students develop reading fluency!




Songs that tell stories and piggyback off of familiar folk tunes are perfect ways to help primary grade students develop reading fluency!




Songs that tell stories and piggyback off of familiar folk tunes are perfect ways to help primary grade students develop reading fluency!




You'll find the link to this FREE Sing Me A Story pack {HERE}.  It includes colorful cover sheets that can be used to create dividers for a class notebook, and a blackline cover sheet that you can use if you decide to staple all of the songs into student sets.   I've even included a list of some of my favorite picture books that are a perfect match for each song!



Songs that tell stories and piggyback off of familiar folk tunes are perfect ways to help primary grade students develop reading fluency!




If you like using songs and rhyme to improve fluency, expression, and rhythm skills in your young readers, you might enjoy this post, Five Days & Five Ways To Use Poetry With Primary Grade Students over on my blog!   Click {HERE} to read all about it and see these two new resources I created!



Songs that tell stories and piggyback off of familiar folk tunes are perfect ways to help primary grade students develop reading fluency!



As always, thanks so much for allowing me to share my stories and songs with you.  May the words of John Denver give you courage to share their magic with your little learners!



Songs that tell stories and piggyback off of familiar folk tunes are perfect ways to help primary grade students develop reading fluency!










4

Keep Kids Active and Engaged While Learning Reading Skills!


Hi everyone! It's  Bex from Reading and Writing Redhead. Before my school vacation started, I had been thinking a lot about movement. In New England we had a VERY long winter in which we rarely went outside for recess. I had come up with new ways to get my kids moving and new brain breaks, but I had been thinking of ways to get movement involved during the academic blocks. Why save it just for breaks?


 
Today I have compiled a resource of some activities that will get your kiddos moving while they are working on their reading skills. Sometimes it is just a little movement, but if you want to really go all out, some of them require you actually going outside to the playground! Most of the ideas are not mine - many have been around for years, so I have no idea who came up with the ideas originally. Some I found recently so I will share with you where and give you a link and a few I thought up myself, although I am sure the idea came from somewhere - someone did something similar or with the same material but I am using it in a different way. You also may have your own great ideas or ones that are not here so please comment and let us know!



Phonemic Awareness and Phonics

Catch it! For this, students stand in a circle (or sit) and the teacher says a one syllable word. She tosses a bean bag or small soft ball to a student, who catches it and says the initial sound, tosses it to another student who says the medial sound, and tosses it to another student who says the final sound. The whole group says the whole word again as the bag gets tossed back to the teacher and she picks a new word to try.

Dribble the Sound or Syllable: Dribble a ball (and say each phoneme in a word or each syllable in a word.
Dribble ball, switch from left to right hand, as say phonemes in a word or syllables in a word for extra challenge and brain work, switch hands as you say each sound or syllable).


I'm Going on a Camping Trip: You know the song! Sit in a circle and clap with a steady beat. Go around the circle and everyone repeats the sentence - "I am going on a camping trip and I am going to bring (fill in blank)". At each student's turn, he says the word of what he is bringing. Each student could think of a word with the same initial, medial or final sound as a word you are working on, or a rhyming word.

Twister with Blends: I have found phonics and other reading games for Twister all around the web, but this is a new "twist" (haha!) on it. Head over to  Apples 4 Bookworms to get the simple and easy (and really fun) directions!



Walk this Way: The teacher says a simple sentence like"The lion roars".  Students repeat it and take one step forward for each word in the sentence. Then, students say how many words or steps there are in the sentence. It might  help for students to hold up a finger for each word to help them count the number of steps/words. A variation is that students can also walk backwards or  sideways for this activity.

Sight Words

Move, Groove, and read: This game is from the blog Mom to 2 Posh Lil' Divas. She has some terrific, creative ideas for learning games.  Head over to her blog for details but it involves target words, music, and lots of moving. I want to play this one!

Word Family Slam: This one was spotted over at the blog Toddler Approved, but I think kids well into elementary school would enjoy it. You could even do it indoors with a free wall and a soft ball. Head over to get the info.

Twister Sight Words: A variation on the Twister game I mentioned that would work well for phonics skills. You use sight words instead. I am not claiming this idea either - A Year as a Reading Teacher has a great post on it. Head over to her blog to read it.



Beach Ball Sight Words: You probably have seen or heard of this idea before, but grab a beach ball, a permanent marker, and write your target words. Toss the ball and read whichever word your finger (or thumb - choose one in advance)  lands on!


Hopscotch: Have hopscotch on the playground? Why not use chalk and on each spot, write a sight word, then toss a pebble, read the word it lands on, and hop away, skipping that space.






Bean Bag Toss: If you have bean bags and one of those bean bag toss goals with the holes in it, try labeling each hole (with a taped on sticky or index card) with a target word and kids have to read the word they are aiming for and then read the word (it might be a different one!) that they actually toss the bag into. What else could you use if you don't have something with holes in it already? I bet someone has a creative and easy idea - let us know!

Sight Word Bowling - use dry erase markers to write sight words on an indoor bowling set, and after knocking pins down, students read the words on the pins they have to stand back up for the next player.

Grammar

Jump Roping Rhymes: With your group, create a jump rope rhyme with antonyms, synonyms, homophones etc. (or words from a word family you are working on), then go outside and try it. Kids can teach their classmates at recess, too!

Step Forward/Back: Group could line up and students could suggest antonym pairs (students would take one step forward and one step back for each word in the pair) or synonyms (2 steps forward)

Syllables

Sound Marching: Teacher says, "We are going to say some words that have more than one syllable. We will march as we say each part of the word." Model by saying the whole word, such as "doorknob" , marching first with your right foot as you say "door" and then with your left foot as you say "knob." Practice together and then try some words with students. After each ask them "How many marching steps did you take for the word? That is the number of syllables."

Raise Up: Teacher says a two (or more) syllable word. Students repeat the word as they raise both their arms above their heads. Students drop one arm as they say each syllable.


Vocabulary and Comprehension

Students move like the animals in the story they are reading

Teaching prepositions using movement

Using body language to show how characters are feeling in the story

Playing charades to review main ideas

Role play or pantomime to retell important story parts

Letter Recognition

Alphabet Hunt on the Go: With clipboards, pencils and papers walk around the school looking for examples of each letter of the alphabet. Kids could write the letters as they see them or you could provide them with a checklist.

Also, any of the Read the Room and Write the Room activities you see all over the web, at TPT and so on are great for getting students up and moving.

Here are a few other resources I found with some terrific ideas:
RMC Health - great post on the importance of exercise and movement based learning opportunities in schools
Reading.org - useing movement andmusic to improve  insttuction
Ascd.org - resources on movement and learning
Pbs.org - lesson plan resources that involve movement
Dr. Martha Eddy's resources for incorporating movement in the classroom

Please comment and let us know how you use movement in your language arts lessons. The more ideas we have, the better our instruction can be!



3